Wellness

Why your children shouldn’t avoid breakfast?

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BreakfastTime and again, it has been reinforced that breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Breakfast provides the body the refueling it needs for the day ahead after going without food for eight to ten hours during the night.

The primary fuel for the brain is glucose and it is dependent upon a constant supply in the blood stream.When one wakes up in the morning, one, in effect, has had an overnight fast, and thus, eating breakfast boosts the levels of glucose in the blood circulation.This specially holds true for children. Without breakfast, our bodies cease to get the jump-start they require to operate at their fullest potential throughout the day.

At school, a hungry child can often lose concentration in class, have no energy for playtime and when famished, snack on unhealthy foods, such as chips or biscuits.

A wholesome and healthy breakfast every day is thus, the best way to prevent the same.

It also helps with inculcating good and long-term eating habits into all infants. Children who eat a sumptuous breakfast are more likely to meet vitamin and mineral requirements than those who skip breakfast. They also tend to consume more vitamin C, calcium, folic acid, and fiber.

When you skip breakfast, you are missing out on your morning dose of essential nutrients. Children who eat breakfast regularly, thus, have more energy, exhibit less aggressive behaviour, and display a better attitude towards school.

The role of breakfast improving performance at school has been discussed and debated for decades. Research has found that children who appear for class tests after skipping breakfast tend to make more errors, do respond as fast and have a slower memory recall.

Studies also suggest that the functioning of the brain is sensitive to short-term variations in nutrient availability. A small fast may impose greater stress on young children, as opposed to adults.

Breakfast also plays an important role in cognitive functions and establishing an eating pattern comprising small regular meals, which is the key to effectively maintaining one’s weight.

Along with timing, what one eats is also important. Choose breakfast foods that are rich in whole grains, fiber and protein, and low in added sugar. Serve a balanced breakfast to young ones that includes some carbohydrates, protein and fiber.

Carbohydrates make for a good and immediate source of energy for the body,while energy from proteins tends to kick-in after the carbs are used up. Fiber helps to provide a feeling of fullness and therefore, discourages overeating.

Some useful ideas for a healthy breakfast include:

  • Vegetable upma, vegetable poha, vermicelli upma (made with whole wheat vermicelli), andidli / dosa with sambhar and chutney
  • Bhakri / Thepla / Chapatis with vegetables
  • Porridges like ragi, rawa, oats made with milk. These are easy to make, are less time consuming, and light too.
  • Multigrain bread with cheese / butter are other convenient options with either an egg preparation, or a vegetable omlette with whole wheat bread
  • Cereals served with low fat milk are also healthy breakfast options with some fruits and nuts on the side

With breakfast, it is healthier to have a good energy drink, besides water such as low fat milk or fruit juice low in sugar – this can also be replaced with fruits. One of  the reasons for childhood obesity is attributed to skipping of meals.

If a child misses breakfast, he tends to eat more during his next meal and all of it may not necessarily be healthy.

In spite of all the compelling information on the benefits of breakfast, why does one out of eight school children start the day without eating breakfast? Some are not encouraged to do so by their parents, while some commonly argue about the lack of time, absence of hunger and distaste for breakfast foods.

No matter what the barrier may be, parents can and should find a way to overcome them.They must set a good example for their children by consuming a sumptuous breakfast themselves.

Children tend to imitate the behaviour of adults, so if they don’t see their parents eating well, they are likely to deprive themselves of the required nutrition.

(Disclaimer: The writer is Priyam Naik, Officer Dietetics, Saifee Hospital. The views expressed are personal opinion.)

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