Minimally invasive treatment for ruptured aneurysm reduces mortality

Emergency Minimally Invasive Repair Effectively Treats Potentially Fatal Ruptured Aneurysms in the Abdomen Without Major Surgery, Involves Less Recovery Time and Fewer Discharges to In-patient Care Facilities–Saving Money for Insurers, Institutions and Individuals
A burst aneurysm (a local area of bulge) in the abdominal aorta–the largest blood vessel in the body– is a deadly condition. In fact, about half of these patients don’t make it to the hospital in time. Those who do more often than not face open surgery to repair the blood vessel. This study finds that a minimally invasive interventional radiology treatment for ruptured aneurysms called endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) is safer than open surgical repair and is associated with lower mortality rates, say researchers at the Society of Interventional Radiology’s 37th Annual Scientific Meeting in San Francisco, Calif.

Abdominal aortic aneurysm is a local area of bulge or dilatation in the abdominal aorta. If left untreated, this bulge can increase in size and–after reaching a certain size–it can burst or rupture causing fatal internal bleeding. In the United States, 9 percent of the population over the age of 65 years has an abdominal aortic aneurysm, and there are 15,000 deaths per year from ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysms. A man is four times more likely to suffer an aneurysm of this kind than a woman, and smokers are also four times as likely to develop the condition.

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